Felipe Pantone

©2020 by FOMO,All rights reserved.

Multistabilitas

2019

limited edition of 200

size: 308mm

material: fiberglass,pu

NT 12,200

Argentinian-Spanish, born 1986

 

Biography

 

Felipe Pantone evokes a spirit in his work that feels like a collision between an analog past and a digitized future, where human beings and machines will inevitably glitch alongside one another in a prism of neon gradients, geometric shapes, optical patterns, and jagged grids.

Based in Spain, Pantone is a byproduct of the technological age when kids unlocked life’s mysteries through the Internet. As a result of this prolonged screen time, he explores how the displacement of the light spectrum impacts color and repetition.

“Color only happens because of light, and light is the only reason why life happens,” Pantone says. "Light and color are the very essence of visual art. Thanks to television, computers, and modern lighting, our perception of light and color has changed completely.”

For Pantone, his art is a meditation on the ways we consume visual information. Drawing inspiration from kinetic artist like Victor Vasarely and Carlos Cruz-Diez — who both utilized the moiré effect (in which lines of contrasting color give the impression of movement) —  his contemporary work produces the sensation of vibration as the viewer’s position changes in relation to the work. To achieve the desired effect, Pantone utilizes modeling software which allows for 3D insights into a project, which then can be translated into frescoes, murals, paintings, and sculptures which give tactile merit to what is occurring in the digital world.

“I grew up as a simple painter, trained as a painter, and now my biggest goal is to get clear of all the academic training and to be able to make art freely, with the tools that work best,” he says.

Whether it’s exhibiting in galleries around the world, transforming a 1994 Chevrolet Corvette into something futuristic, or painting the largest mural in Portugal,  Pantone’s diverse applications are united by the intersection of technology and fine art.

“I try to create things that are not supposed to be where they are,” he says. “To bring awareness of certain things, to move people’s thoughts elsewhere."